There are 11 apps in Depression


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Angry Birds

Angry Birds
developed by Rovio, Finland


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

Chinese / English / French / German / Italian / Japanese / Spanish

Cost: Free on Android; Apple: £0.79 [approximately €1.14, $1.23]; Blackberry: £3.50 [approximately €5.04, $5.46]

Game involving characters modelled on birds and pigs, and which is said to feature physics-based gameplay.

“It is a genius app, addictive in a healthy sense, and providing quality ‘mindfulness’ (in the current jargon). Very absorbing. Great for anxiety, in particular, but also for depression. There are probably some excellent self-management apps for people with mental illness, but I’m not aware of them. The scope is enormous in terms of social connection, information, and coping resources (for example, soothing, distracting, etc).” Star Wards | PatientView survey, July-August 2011


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Big White Wall

Big White Wall
developed by Big White Wall, UK


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoringInformation

English

Cost: Free (signup required)

Provides advice helpful to people with anxiety, debt, stress, or work problems.

"I have used Big White Wall (BWW) in the past, having been given a code from the UK university I attend. This entitled me to three months' free membership. Alternatively, BWW is free from some of the UK's NHS Trusts, as well as being free for serving UK armed forces' personnel, veterans and their families. Membership for people who don’t fall into those categories is £24. One of the best aspects was the wall itself - this allows you to express yourself visually when sometimes there aren’t the words to express how you’re feeling. Self-administered clinical tests, guides, tips and articles to improve wellbeing are also available, along with feedback suggesting next steps in self care and management of how you feel." TheSite.org (Youth Support Charity), UK | Source no longer available


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

CBT Keeper

CBT Keeper
developed by Euthymic Labs LLC


RemindersSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoringTrackersInformation

English

Cost: Free, upgrade to remove ads costs £1.27 [approximately €1.81, $1.99]
Relies on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to help the user overcome anxiety and depression.
“ 'CBT Keeper' is a mobile app that teaches simple techniques to help you overcome depression and anxiety. It’s built upon the principles of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), a proven treatment for depression, anxiety, and many other mental illnesses. CBT works because it helps you change the negative thoughts and behaviours that drag you down.” Self-injury.net, USA | http://bit.ly/1L68CyP


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help

Cognitive Diary CBT Self-Help
developed by Excel At Life LLC, USA


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoring

English

Cost: Free
Aims to teach the user self-help tools of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as a means of challenging irrational thinking that might otherwise lead to anger, anxiety, depression, relationship conflict, or stress.
“On the plus side: it wonderfully walks individuals through a cognitive-behavioural therapy technique. It allows the user to create a record of their thoughts, and work through how they can challenge those thoughts, to come up with a better outcome. This therapy can be used to alleviate symptoms for several mental health issues. The down side of the app is that it does not connect with other apps, and only offers the one technique of addressing thinking patterns and challenging thoughts. There is not enough patient education. It would work much better in concert with web apps, such as ‘Beating the Blues’.” Patient group specialising in helping patients navigate national healthcare policy, USA | PatientView survey, July-August 2012


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Dragon in the Attic

Dragon in the Attic
developed by Four girls from Horbury Primary School; with support from West Wakefield Health & Wellbeing Ltd, a network of six neighbouring GP practices in Wakefield, West Yorkshire


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English

Cost: FREE
An App for 8 - 12 year old boys and girls to help them mentally cope with bullying.
Dragon in the Attic was the winner of a local school competition, where “one hundred Year 6 students were involved in the project, creating 20 initial concepts that were shortlisted to six with the help of some peer to peer judging and feedback from their Skype in the Classroom mentors and local GPs. The students presented their health app concepts to a panel of ‘Dragon’s Den’ style judges. Dragon in the Attic was the winning app concept and presented by the winning team from Horbury Primary School.” Horbury Primary School and West Wakefield Health & Wellbeing Ltd. | http://bit.ly/258GQZx


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)  ·  Medical

iCouch CBT

iCouch CBT
developed by iCouch Inc (Brian Dear)


Improving communicationSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoringTrackersInformation

English / German / Spanish

Cost: £1.91 [approximately €2.37, $2.99]
Allows people living with anger, anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, or stress to record negative thoughts.
Allows people living with anger, anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, or stress to record negative thoughts.
“iCouch CBT walks me through a complex process. It provides attention to the specifics of my problem, while using a structured way to get out of the problem. Allows for complexities, but relies on simple steps to do it.” Person living with mental health issues, Canada | PatientView survey, August 2014


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

MoodKit

MoodKit
developed by Thriveport LLC, USA


RemindersSelf-monitoringTrackersInformation

English

Cost: £3.99 [approximately €5.68, $6.23]
A means by which people with anxiety or depression can improve their mood.
“ ‘Mood Kit’ is the slickest of the cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) apps, and it has some nice features that make it easy to use and to personalise. The app is made by Thriveport and the authors are psychologists. The app is based around CBT ideas, and functions much like a daily thought record. The four main functions of the product are: 1. Increase participation in activities that lift mood. 2. Identify and change interfering thoughts. 3.Rate and track mood. And 4. Create journals to track thoughts, experiences, etc. The best features of this app are the scrolling data bank of feeling states, the library of cognitive distortions, and the reoccurring use of scales which let you rate intensity of a feeling or thought just by sliding your finger. Run through of the app: The ‘Activities Guide’ lets you sort through what is the easiest and what is the hardest for you (socialising, exercising, sleeping, etc), and prioritise which areas to target first. The ‘Thought Checker’ section asks you to recount a situation that was difficult, describe how you felt, and how much you felt that way. This is basic daily thought record material, but the app makes it easier for you by having a ready list of feelings to scroll through and choose, and a sliding tool to measure the intensity of the feeling. You then are asked to list your automatic thoughts in a clear and easy-to-understand manner. From there, the app takes you to a list of cognitive distortions (descriptions included) that you easily scroll through and click to choose. A section titled ‘Mood’ is a very simple but highly useful way to keep track of your daily mood. It’s simply a number rating from 1-10 (1 the worst, 10 the best) that you scroll through and select. You can add notes if you choose, but can also just quickly select a number. The app will track the numbers and chart them for you, providing a wonderful visual of your mood over time. The ‘Journal’ section is hard to use on an iPhone (for those of us who have a hard time typing more than a couple of sentences on the device), but easier on the iPad. It is a section for recording notes about mood, activities, thoughts, etc. This section is pretty standard. ‘Mood Kit’ is one of the best CBT apps I have seen. The mood-tracking ability (complete with graphs) is great, and the simplicity and ease of use make this app one that even the most reluctant user will have a hard time avoiding. I have used this app myself, and frequently recommend it to teens in my clinical practice.” Elisa Nebolsine: Cognitive Therapy for Kids, USA | http://bit.ly/1j3X15c


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Moodometer

Moodometer
developed by Mubaloo, UK


RemindersSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoringTrackersInformation

English

Cost: Free
Interactive mood diary for monitoring and understanding emotional wellbeing.
Recommended by the Men’s Health Forum (MHF), UK | http://bit.ly/1awqe3g


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Safe & Sound

Safe & Sound
developed by Tri-Tech Skills Center in Kennewick, Washington


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsImproving communicationSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesInformation

English

Cost: Free
Addresses a way for teens to manage stress and feelings of depression.
The Safe&Sound app concept brings mental health awareness and resources for teens. Inspired by personal experiences and recent school shootings—including one in their home state—the team knew that the app could help teens express their feelings in a safe way and reach out for help when needed. Features for this app include daily stress management, information on stress, anxiety, depression, journaling, and resources. Safe&Sound will be a functioning, downloadable app by June 2015. Mental Health America, May 2015 | http://bit.ly/1G7akeh


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

T2 Mood Tracker

T2 Mood Tracker
developed by National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), USA


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesSelf-monitoringTrackers

English

Cost: Free

Allows people with anxiety, brain injury, depression, post-traumatic stress, or stress to monitor their moods and their general well-being.

“It helps me track my moods—which is useful, because often, over time, it is difficult for me to know where my mood has gone, and to be aware of developing changes in mood and feeling. This app is helpful for me, and the professionals I speak to. It can be good to use for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and things like that.” HUG Action for Mental Health, UK | PatientView survey, July-August 2011


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

WhatsMyM3

WhatsMyM3
developed by M3 Information, USA


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesTrackersInformation

Arabic / Chinese / English / French / German / Hindi / Italian / Japanese / Korean / Portuguese / Russian / Spanish

Cost: Free

27-question online questionnaire that assesses a user's risk of anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

"WhatsMyM3, a new mobile health app that asks a series of questions to determine whether users exhibit symptoms of various mental health disorders. WhatsMyM3 (originally My Mood Monitor) can tell if users are at an increased risk for depression, anxiety." National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), USA | http://bit.ly/13D9AMf


Tags: Medical

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