There are 12 apps in Eyesight problems


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Bemyeyes

Bemyeyes
developed by Hans Jorgen Wiberg, Christian Erfurt Hansen


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilities

Arabic / Bokmål / Catalan / Chinese / Croatian / Czech / Danish / Dutch / English / Estonian / French / German / Greek / Hebrew / Hindi / Hungarian / Italian / Japanese / Korean / Lithuanian / Norwegian / Polish / Portuguese / Romanian / Russian / Slovak / Spanish / Swedish / Thai / Turkish / Vietnamese / Ukrainian / Urdu

Cost: Free
Bemyeyes creates a live video connection between a visually-impaired person and a sighted volunteer when they need remote help.
“Be My Eyes is an extremely powerful platform whose time has come…My go-to resource for those times when greater independence can best be achieved by knowing when and how to ask for help.” Bill Holton, American Foundation for the Blind | http://bit.ly/2nhW91b


Tags: Disability  ·  Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

BIG Launcher

BIG Launcher
developed by Cofis CZ, sro, Czech Republic


Improving communication

Arabic / Chinese / Croatian / Czech / Danish / Dutch / English / Estonian / Finnish / French / German / Greek / Hebrew / Hindi / Hungarian / Indonesian / Italian / Japanese / Korean / Lithuanian / Norwegian / Polish / Portuguese / Romanian / Russian / Slovak / Spanish / Swedish / Thai / Turkish / Vietnamese

Cost: 'demo' version free, £7.50 [approximately €10.81, $11.70]

Simplified phone ‘home’ screen for older people, and for people with visual impairment (and even for anyone who dislikes numerous phone icons).

Recommended by AGE Platform Europe (AGE) and by the European Disability Forum (EDF) as part of the 2011 Vodafone Foundation’s ‘Smart Accessibility’ competition Recommended by AGE Platform Europe (AGE) and by the European Disability Forum (EDF) as part of the 2011 Vodafone Foundation | http://bit.ly/OWoFOo


Tags: Disability

Color ID (Free)

Color ID (Free)
developed by GreenGar; Chirag Mehta, USA


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesInformation

English

Cost: Free

When a user photographs an object, and then taps the on-screen image of the photographed object, the app will read aloud the object's colour.

Recommended by the Kent Association for the Blind (KAB), UK Kent Association for the Blind (KAB), UK | PatientView survey 2012-2013


Tags: Disability

LookTel Money Reader

LookTel Money Reader
developed by Ipplex Holdings Corporation, USA


Improving communicationSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilities

Bokmål / Chinese / Danish / English / Finnish / French / German / Greek / Hungarian / Italian / Japanese / Korean / Norwegian / Polish / Russian / Spanish / Swedish

Cost: £7.99 [approximately €8.90, $12.48]

Recognises currency, and speaks the denomination, enabling people with a visual impairment or blindness to identify and count banknotes.

“Scans money of a wide range of different currencies, and it will tell you the value of each note. [Item 48 on RNIB list.]” Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB), UK | Source no longer available


Tags: Disability

NMO Resources

NMO Resources
developed by Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesInformation

English

Cost: Free

Information and support for patients, carers and clinicians dealing with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO).

“Get the NMO basics with the latest in NMO information, videos, and answers to frequently asked questions.

Learn more about the latest scientific and medical insights into adult and pediatric disease, imaging, laboratory tests, and potential relationships of NMO/SD to other autoimmune diseases.

The NMO video library includes patient stories, questions about NMO, seminars from our NMO Roundtables, and more.

Stay up-to-date with access to fresh peer-reviewed research that have been made available and open-source.

Learn more about clinical trials, including how to participate.

Keep all of your NMO related notes and thoughts in one place.

Connect with all the NMO support groups that meet in person as well as online or through telecons.

Everything you need to help us with blood samples and/or clinical data donations for our Biorepository. Blood samples and clinical data are vital for NMO research.

Learn more about The Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation and connect with us on social media.

Browse this organized database of over 200 doctors with awareness and experience in NMO.

Access our popular patient resource guide.

In addition to native VoiceOver ability, you can modify font size and font thickness with accessibility settings.”

The Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation, the US-based charity which created the app | http://bit.ly/2RLAOMv


Tags: Disability  ·  Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)  ·  Medical

Parkinson’s EasyCall

Parkinson’s EasyCall
developed by Tecmark


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsImproving communicationSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English

Cost: Free
Enables phone calls to be made with a single touch to the smartphone screen.
“ ‘EasyCall’ is a free mobile phone app (application) designed to make using a phone keypad on a smartphone a lot easier. Basically, it enables you to call a phone number using just one touch.” ‘Tips and Hints for People with Parkinson’s’, Parkinson’s UK, p.23 | http://bit.ly/1ooIn88


Tags: Disability

RNIB Navigator

RNIB Navigator
developed by Sendero Group


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English / French / German / Hebrew / Spanish

Cost: Subscription (3 month or 1 year) ; In UK 30 days subscription £9.99, 1 year 64.99
App to help visually-impaired people to navigate step by step following voiced guidance.
“GPS has been available on the iPhone for some years now, however flipping between apps which provided separate components to the independent traveler's need for information was necessary…This is the first time that I feel I can use one app for all my GPS requirements when on the go.” Ibrahim, user of app, Peterborough UK | http://www.rnib.org.uk/rnib-navigator-–-app-month


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)  ·  Medical

Seeing AI

Seeing AI
developed by Microsoft


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English

Cost: Free

App designed for people with visual impairments to describe in sound what the phone camera `sees’.

“Although artificial intelligence (AI) has been around for a while now, the main AI technology to reach the visual impairment market is the talking camera.

Broadly, AI means that computers interpret the information they receive and tailor their responses based on our behaviour. You may already be familiar with apps such as TapTapSee and VocalEyes, but Microsoft’s Seeing AI (currently only available on Apple devices) is a cut above the rest. 

Seeing AI combines the functionality of these predecessors with that of optical character recognition (OCR) apps that scan and read text aloud.

The free, easy-to-use app can scan and read formatted text, learn and recognise faces, scan barcodes to identify products, and interpret general scenes.

The range of features and its accuracy are remarkable – but what impresses me most is the simple, intuitive way in which the app is controlled. 

With my previous favourite OCR app, you had to hold the phone above a document and then capture it by pressing a shutter button with your other hand: no mean feat, even for the most dextrous of us. If you didn’t capture the whole document, tough. You got what you snapped.

With Seeing AI, however, you receive verbal hints that tell you whether the camera can see the entire document. And there is no need to wrestle with your phone to keep it steady while hitting the shutter button: the app automatically takes the photo for you. 

If you think that the scene description mode is good, then wait until you try the facial recognition setting! Not only can Seeing AI learn familiar faces, but it will also interpret moods and predict ages. This last feature could offend the more sensitive subject, but it proved quite accurate when I tried it at home (much to my wife’s chagrin).

The product scanner is a great help in the supermarket too. For me, zapping the barcode will mean the end of buying apple sauce when I want mustard, or spearmint when I want peppermint. 

Later versions of the app also include banknote detection, handwriting recognition, and modes to gauge light levels or identify colours. 

As ever, the app is not perfect, but it is rapidly becoming the must-have app of the year.”

Matt Harrison, Technology Services Manager at The Beacon Centre, writing in a blog from the Macular Society, a UK charity fighting to end sight loss caused by macular disease. |


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Soundscape

Soundscape
developed by Microsoft Australia with Vision Australia, and other charities and not-for profit organisations


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English

Cost: Free

App to help people with visual needs to navigate safely while walking

“Microsoft Australia and Vision Australia have announced the availability of Soundscape, a new application that empowers people who are blind or have low vision to explore the world around them through a 3D audio experience.

Soundscape uses 3D audio and location awareness to provide users with information about their surroundings to help build a mental map of what’s around them. By setting an audio beacon on a chosen destination or a familiar landmark, a user will always be able to keep track of where that location is as they make their way there. The app will also call out roads, intersections, and landmarks as a user walks past.

By wearing a stereo headset plus Soundscape, people who are blind or have low vision can explore the outdoor world with greater independence. With the 3D audio technology, the sounds are perceived as coming from the direction of the point of interest, so the user can build an image of what’s around from the sounds in the environment and the information coming from the Soundscape app.

Unlike traditional navigation apps that provide turn by turn directions, Soundscape helps users build an appreciation of the space as they move through it, empowering them to make their own navigational choices while at the same time enhancing their overall experience.

Used in combination with traditional mobility aids, like canes and dogs, a person with low or no vision can get from A to B and gain an appreciation of their surroundings on the journey – particularly if the environment is an unfamiliar one.

 “Soundscape gives me confidence in an outside environment, by helping me understand what’s around me – whether it’s a restaurant, café, railway station, walking bike/track, park, business or even a street name. It allows me to build a mental map of my neighbourhood,” said David Woodbridge, Access Technology Advisor, Vision Australia.

“Rather than dictate what I should do, it allows me to make my own decisions based on the information it is providing, meaning I am always in control. For me, it really is about feeling stress free when I’m out and about. The app is easy to use and I have my own personal markers set for different locations. My local coffee shop is always a priority and the ‘coffee shop’ marker on Soundscape gets a lot of use.”

…The intention of Soundscape is not to replace aids such as a dog guide or cane, but to enable a user to more naturally and intuitively connect with their environment without disrupting their ability to attend to other tasks, activities, or interactions with other people.

To this end, the product development group in Microsoft’s Artificial Intelligence and Research (AI&R) team have been working directly with Vision Australia’s Orientation and Mobility team for the last six months to have them test and integrate the use of Soundscape in their work with clients.”

Vision Australia, the not for profit organisation providing services to support people who are blind or have low vision. | http://bit.ly/2yLpHMg


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

VisionSim by Braille Institute

VisionSim by Braille Institute
developed by Evil Genius Technologies (EGT), USA


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesInformation

English

Cost: Free

Relies upon the phone's camera (along with digital filters) to allow a user to experience the symptoms of eye disease, and to see the world through the simulated eyes of a person experiencing one of nine degenerative eye conditions.

“This app of ours was designed to foster understanding and compassion for the millions of people affected by these eye conditions.” Braille Institute of America, USA | PatientView survey, July-August 2012


Tags:

VizWiz

VizWiz
developed by Rochester Human Computer Interaction (ROC HCI), USA


Allows networking with other people like me / Family / FriendsImproving communicationSupport to deal with symptoms/disabilitiesInformation

English

Cost: Free

Allows a visually-impaired user to put specific questions to sighted people, and then receive spoken answers from them in nearly real-time (sometimes in less than 30 seconds).

“We at the RNIB heard from someone who’s been using ‘VizWiz’ for a while: “I was very excited when I first heard about this app, particularly the bit about getting answers to questions from web workers, and from people on my Twitter account. This meant that I could ask a wide variety of questions, not just the usual “What's this?” I’ve used the app quite a few times now. At times, I did get a ropey Internet connection, which meant that I couldn’t get any answers. However, once I got the connection, then I only had to wait about a minute for the answers to my questions. I think, to be honest, this app would work better with an iPhone 4, as it has a better camera and a flash—which means that you get better quality pictures. So, say for asking questions about colours, the picture would be a more accurate representation of the colour. However, I have used the app successfully for many things, including finding out how many slices of cold meat I had in a packet—which you probably couldn’t find out if you used something such as ‘oMoby’. So, I’d definitely recommend this app to anyone wanting to find information”. Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), UK | Source no longer available


Tags: Disability

Zoom Plus Video Magnifier

Zoom Plus Video Magnifier
developed by i. 232 Studios; ii. Ian Hamilton Design and Consultancy Ltd. iii. Digital Accessibility Centre (DAC)


Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

English

Cost: Free

Video magnifier.

Recommended by AGE Platform Europe (AGE) and by the European Disability Forum (EDF) as part of the 2011 Vodafone Foundation’s ‘Smart Accessibility’ competition Recommended by AGE Platform Europe (AGE) and by the European Disability Forum (EDF) as part of the 2011 Vodafone Foundation | http://bit.ly/OWoFOo


Tags: Disability

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