SymTrac


Listed in: Multiple sclerosis  
SymTrac

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

Free

Tracks the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis as well as relapses on current treatment.

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any country where English is spoken. [The app is also avilable in Swedish where it is called Day by Day]

Cost

Free

Developer

Aurora [UK] and Pond Healthcare Innovation [Sweden]
(Based in United Kingdom)
http://www.auroracomms.com/

Funder

Novartis

Medical Adviser

MS Trust and with people who have MS; the app's medical steering group was led by Dr Martin Duddy, a consultant neurologist at Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary

Features

Allows networking with other people like me / Family / Friends Allows networking with other people like me / Family / Friends
Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities
Self-monitoring Self-monitoring
Trackers Trackers
Information Information

Summary

SymTrac is a free app that helps people with MS track general wellbeing and symptoms over time. The data recorded can be viewed in easy-to-read charts and shared with MS specialist teams to make the most of vital consultation time and support decision making. Approved as safe by the NHS Library of Health Apps.


Tags: Medical

Reviews

Reviewer: Amy Bowen, Director of Service Development at the MS Trust
Review: "We were pleased to contribute to this app, as it fills a gap in the resources available for people with MS. SymTrac is a practical tool that will help people make the most of crucial consultation time when important discussions take place about people's care. We are delighted that the MS Trust exercises form part of the app."
Source: http://bit.ly/19z59sp
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/19z59sp
Reviewer: MS Ireland
Review: "SymTrac is a free app designed by people with MS, developed in conjunction with Novartis Ireland, which allows people with MS to build a comprehensive picture of how they feel over a long period of time. It stores information about what part of their body is affected, and the severity of each symptom recorded."
Source: http://bit.ly/19z5tr5
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/19z5tr5
Reviewer: Multiple Sclerosis Research, Barts and The London Neuroimmunology Group
Review: "This is an ap to help you remember your signs and symptoms and you can see the video and down load the app or even get the paper version if you are worried about "Big Brother"  and Pharma"
Source: http://bit.ly/19z5Od8
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/19z5Od8
Reviewer: Blogger
Review:

"I've just come across an app that has been designed by people with MS to record your symtoms and wellbeing. It looks pretty good and thought it would benefit those that have been newly diagnosed or others that need to record their funny symptoms and such. I find if I don't record my symptoms it is harder to describe later on."


Source: MS Society UK
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/19z6fUN
Reviewer: Trishna Bharadia
Review: "Setting up a profile is an easy twostep process and, as data is stored solely on a user’s phone, I was happy enough with data security. What I wasn’t so happy about was when three weeks into using the app, it spontaneously erased my profile and all the diary data. I had to start over again and could not find a way of retrieving the lost data or setting up a back-up to safeguard future losses. Strangely, some of my symptom data (which is input separately from the diary) reappeared a few days later but the diary entries remain elusive and I have no idea why. Plus, the app started to crash repeatedly on certain functions. Usability issues were a recurrent theme in feedback from my tester panel, with “annoying” being used to describe the app on more than one occasion. My MS is currently stable, like many of the panel members, so my entries tended to track general wellbeing, concentration, memory, energy and sleep quality. I don’t have any persistent symptoms apart from fatigue, so when I experienced weakness in my left leg and my feet started to drag, my mind went into overdrive. I only noticed it because the little alert that asks “How is your MS today?” made me think about every little thing I was feeling. Coincidentally, I had my annual MRI scan at around the same time, which thankfully came back clear, so I realised that while I’d managed to convince myself I was potentially having a relapse, in reality I was actually just tired and couldn’t be bothered to pick up my feet! This is one criticism I would have about being reminded daily to think about how you’re feeling. It can make you paranoid. Being reminded every day that you have MS is not necessarily a good thing either. This is something that many of my testers felt. One tester said that being reminded was irritating, as she didn’t want to think about it every day, while another commented that “being reminded unnecessarily I have MS, especially on a good day, actually made me stop using the app on a regular basis.” Despite these negatives, the app is very thorough and detailed when it comes to logging your symptoms. You can pinpoint a specific body part using a body map, although this could do with refinement, and you can then choose from a list of possible symptoms. You can also produce graphs to easily see your progress, which can be shared with your healthcare team."
Source: MS-UK
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1HZqeHv

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