MoodKit

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

£3.99 [approximately €5.68, $6.23]

A means by which people with anxiety or depression can improve their mood.

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with English

Cost

£3.99 [approximately €5.68, $6.23]

Developer

Thriveport LLC, USA
(Based in United States)
http://www.thriveport.com

Funder

Thriveport LLC, USA

Medical Adviser

Clinical psychologist staff of Thriveport LLC, USA

Features

Reminders Reminders
Self-monitoring Self-monitoring
Trackers Trackers
Information Information

Summary

Draws on the techniques of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) to help people with anxiety or depression to improve their mood. An ‘activities’ tool suggests activities that can enhance a sense of well-being and reduce negative feelings. A ‘thought checker’ aims to identify and modify negative thoughts. A ‘mood tracker’ allows estimates of mood to be recorded and ranked (mood ratings displayed in daily, 7-day or 30-day charts). Notes about moods can be input on the PIN-protected ‘journal’ facility. Templates guide the user into making journal entries most likely to improve mood. Voice entry is possible on Siri-enabled devices. Journal entries and mood ratings can be emailed to medical professionals.


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Reviews

Reviewer: Elisa Nebolsine: Cognitive Therapy for Kids, USA
Review: “ ‘Mood Kit’ is the slickest of the cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) apps, and it has some nice features that make it easy to use and to personalise. The app is made by Thriveport and the authors are psychologists. The app is based around CBT ideas, and functions much like a daily thought record. The four main functions of the product are: 1. Increase participation in activities that lift mood. 2. Identify and change interfering thoughts. 3.Rate and track mood. And 4. Create journals to track thoughts, experiences, etc. The best features of this app are the scrolling data bank of feeling states, the library of cognitive distortions, and the reoccurring use of scales which let you rate intensity of a feeling or thought just by sliding your finger. Run through of the app: The ‘Activities Guide’ lets you sort through what is the easiest and what is the hardest for you (socialising, exercising, sleeping, etc), and prioritise which areas to target first. The ‘Thought Checker’ section asks you to recount a situation that was difficult, describe how you felt, and how much you felt that way. This is basic daily thought record material, but the app makes it easier for you by having a ready list of feelings to scroll through and choose, and a sliding tool to measure the intensity of the feeling. You then are asked to list your automatic thoughts in a clear and easy-to-understand manner. From there, the app takes you to a list of cognitive distortions (descriptions included) that you easily scroll through and click to choose. A section titled ‘Mood’ is a very simple but highly useful way to keep track of your daily mood. It’s simply a number rating from 1-10 (1 the worst, 10 the best) that you scroll through and select. You can add notes if you choose, but can also just quickly select a number. The app will track the numbers and chart them for you, providing a wonderful visual of your mood over time. The ‘Journal’ section is hard to use on an iPhone (for those of us who have a hard time typing more than a couple of sentences on the device), but easier on the iPad. It is a section for recording notes about mood, activities, thoughts, etc. This section is pretty standard. ‘Mood Kit’ is one of the best CBT apps I have seen. The mood-tracking ability (complete with graphs) is great, and the simplicity and ease of use make this app one that even the most reluctant user will have a hard time avoiding. I have used this app myself, and frequently recommend it to teens in my clinical practice.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1j3X15c
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1j3X415
Reviewer: James Hardie CBT/Moodjuice, UK
Review: “This app has some smart graphics and has a lot of good written content. The authors have also included a lot of background information about the contents, and the cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) approach of this app. Each of the four main tools has a comprehensive outline, with perhaps overly-detailed instructions for how to use the app. It is feature-rich, which I think could distract from its main purpose, and some of the text I found to be a bit on the small side. Activities: This section of the app contains a very extensive bank of activity ideas, from which you can select ones that you would like to ‘commit to’. You can create your own activities, review your commitments, share them, add them to your calendar, and mark them as completed. Activities are categorised into types: Productivity; Social; Enjoyment; Physical; Healthy Habits; ‘ThriveTips’. You can browse through a list or category of activities, but by responding to a set of questions, the app can suggest suitable activities to address particular areas that you feel you are less involved in (eg socialising, physical activity, healthy lifestyle). This section of the app may be very useful for someone looking to stretch themselves and test some of their assumptions. It presents an interesting mix of approaches, ranging from behavioural experiments to behavioural activation exercises. Thoughts: This tab functions as a thought diary or ‘thought checker’ where you can record: Situation; Emotions (from a selection); Thought; Distortions (from a selection); Modified thought; Modified emotion. Journal: The journal feature is really just a record of your engagement with other sections of the app. You can use it to review your thought diary, mood and activity notes. I think the best feature of this section, if not the whole app, is the template entries, which present a really helpful structure or series of questions for you to record goals, activity outcomes and reflections on your progress. Some of these entries are quite direct, but contain well-crafted questions, some of which address issues such as goal setting, problem solving and motivation. Mood: I initially found the controls for this mood tracker quite clumsy, particularly the oversized dial. I really like the note feature which asks you to reflect on ‘What factors contributed to your mood rating?’. The chart graphic tracking your mood ratings is very smart looking, and a highlight of the app, in my opinion. However, I think it is an oversight not to have included time-of-day resolution in the mood tracker, rather than just the date. Extras: A really interesting, but relatively hidden feature of the app, is the ability to set reminders for activities, thought records, or mood tracking. This has the potential to encourage more consistent and sustained engagement with some of the exercises.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1j3XbJR
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1j3Xd4G
Reviewer: PsyberGuide, USA
Review: “ ‘MoodKit’ is an Apple app designed to help users overcome problems with depression. Based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), ‘MoodKit’ offers users a variety of tools to help with mental illness: skills to cope with mood issues in the moment, guided activities to challenge problematic thinking, and a symptom-tracking function to let users stay on top of their symptoms and progress. It contains a journal for users to record important events, or information for easy access in the future.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1j3XsfU
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1j3XtAE
Reviewer: Mobile Social Work, USA
Review: “MoodKit is an iPhone app that helps people to cope with depression or anxiety. It is developed by Thriveport, the main team of which includes clinical psychologists Dr Edrick Dorian and Dr Drew Erhardt.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1samOs0
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1samQjH

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