Cook & Count


Listed in: Carbo-counting / Diet  Information  Diet  
Cook & Count

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

£3.99 [approximately €5.68, $6.23]

Contains nutritional information on calories, fat, protein, fibre and sugars, as well as carbohydrate.

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with English

Cost

£3.99 [approximately €5.68, $6.23]

Developer

iQo Solutions Inc, USA and UK; designer: Daniel Pidcock, UK
(Based in United Kingdom)
Developer: http://hiqo-solutions.com ; designer: http://www.piddy.co.uk/index.php

Funder

Health Apps Ltd, UK

Medical Adviser

Health psychologist Deborah Wilder, founder of Health Apps Ltd, UK

Features

Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities
Self-monitoring Self-monitoring
Information Information

Summary

Cook & Count mobile app, by Health Apps, is the nutritional app for home cooking. It calculates key nutritional and allergen information for any dish you prepare, just like a supermarket label, only better.

Our mission is to make home cooking easy and safe for everyone. We help those with special dietary or medical requirements to enjoy all the benefits of home cooking by providing the tools and encouragement to overcome obstacles.

NHS approved Cook & Count is great for educating calorie awareness and portion control to encourage weight loss. It’s perfect for carb counting for people with type 1 diabetes and it’s great for type 2 diabetes prevention and management. Now with the latest update anyone with food allergies or intolerances e.g. gluten or dairy-free, can use our smart filters to see which ingredients are safe for them to eat.

Cook & Count is recommended by dietitians, nutritionists and specialist diabetes dietitians, nurses and educators. Users can build and save recipes in their own digital recipe book, follow our tried and tested recipe ideas, and share recipes with friends and family - all including thorough nutritional information.


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Reviews

Reviewer: Diabetes Diet Choices, UK
Review: “ ‘Cook & Count Carbs’ is a new mobile app for anyone who wants to keep a close eye on the amount of carbohydrate they are eating. … It’s aimed primarily at people with type-1 diabetes, who need to match their insulin doses carefully with the amount of carbohydrate they eat. But the developers say it’s also suitable for people following a low-carb diet, or athletes who want to monitor their carbohydrate intake. Cook & Count Carbs is a very neat and clever app, which is super-easy and enjoyable to use. All you do is find your ingredients from the searchable database of 2,000 generic (non-branded) foods, key in the weight you’re using (in grams or ounces), and build them into recipes. You can also increase the database yourself by adding in your own ingredients as you go. Once you’ve finished inputting your recipe or meal, the app totals the amount of carbs per recipe and per serving. … The strength of Cook & Count Carbs is that it homes in on carb-counting, which is a crucial part of managing daily life for people with type-1 diabetes, and those with type-2 diabetes, or gestational diabetes, who need insulin. The app’s strength, though, is also its weakness, because it only supplies carbohydrate values—no information on calories, fat, protein, fibre or salt is provided at the moment (although this may be built into future versions, in which case the app would be a really formidable resource). Because of its narrow focus, Cook & Count Carbs is probably not the best choice if you are aiming to lose weight to manage your type-2 diabetes, where other factors such as fat, fibre, salt, and above all, calories, are important.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1gc3ud0
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1gc3ud2
Reviewer: ‘Vicki’s Notebook: Diabetes v Life’ blog, UK
Review:

“The app is incredibly easy to use. You can build a recipe, view the recipes already on the app, or go to the information screen. To start building a recipe, you tap ‘add’. The list of ingredients installed on the app is vast, but there is the option to add a custom ingredient if what you’re searching for isn’t there. You need to weigh how much of the ingredient you are using in the recipe, and have the option to choose between grams and ounces as your unit of measurement. Continue doing this until all your ingredients have been saved to the recipe. The app then calculates the total carbohydrate value for the meal, and you input how many servings the recipe is for. Then, as well as the total value, you also get the carbohydrate value per portion. … So, app pros: first, I’ve been a lot more open to trying new recipes, as I now have a way to properly carb count the meals. The interface is great, and it really is easy to use (honest, it is, I’m awful when it comes to technology/apps, but this is so simple). Not that I’ve needed to use it yet, but I’m very grateful for the option to add a custom ingredient. You never know, maybe one of these days I’ll whip up something so obscure that I’ll need to use this function. My one ‘issue’ with the app is the fact that everything has to be weighed. Don’t get me wrong, I understand that weight of food items is essential for carbohydrate counting, but for some things, especially vegetables, I’d much prefer it to just input ‘1 carrot’, as opposed to actually having to weigh out the portion. But that’s just me wanting to cut corners where possible, and vegetables are generally very low carb.”


Source: http://bit.ly/1gB0wsF
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1gB0uBi
Reviewer: ‘Every Day Ups and Downs, a Diabetes Blog’, UK
Review: “For those of us juggling busy lives and diabetes there is the added complication that those nasty, chemical-laden packaged foods tend to come with a very handy grid of information providing the all-important carb count. Cooking from scratch is great, but trying to get an even vaguely-accurate carb-count for what ends up on the plate can be a bit of a bind. Well, not any more. … ‘Cook & Count Carbs’ focuses on doing one thing well. It doesn’t fuss about with calories, or offer nutritional info about fats, proteins, or other micronutrients, but allows you to very quickly look up individual ingredients, or build complete recipes, and then work out carbs-per-portion for however many people you are dividing it between. I have fallen foul of the promise of carb-lookup functionality a few times before. Some apps use lists which are based largely on foods and brands only available in the US. Others require an active network connection to access the data. My favourite waste of time so far was an app that allowed you look up a huge range of ingredients, but only allowed you to indicate quantity by ‘serving’. So, you could choose one, two, or nine servings of wholemeal pasta, and get a carb count, but absolutely nowhere did it specify how much pasta one should cook for an individual serving. Utterly useless. Thankfully, C&CC is a lot better thought-through than that. There is a pretty comprehensive list of ready-made choices for both raw and cooked foods, all available by weight (grams or ounces depending on user preference). Brilliantly, the app also allows you to define your own ‘custom’ ingredients from the food labels on the stuff that you actually buy (if that turns out to be missing, or significantly different from the predefined list). And you can use it anywhere ... fully networked city-centre apartment, or a farmhouse in the back of beyond. You carry on adding as many ingredients as you want to, and then flick to the ‘total’ screen, which allows you to divide the whole recipe into as many servings as you are expecting. This number isn’t fixed, so, if you decide to divide into more or fewer portions later on, or the next time you prepare the meal, you can easily get an updated count. You then have the option of saving your recipe to refer back to in your ‘My recipes’ section. You can add a photo of what it should look like, and even add detailed notes on how to prepare the recipe, if you wish. One slight quirk is that you can only edit a recipe you have previously saved if you have added at least one ‘Method’ entry. Once you have done that (even if it only says ‘Method’) an edit icon appears below the recipe, and you are able to amend and update any quantities, add or remove ingredients, and then save a new version, if desired. For keen social media types, there is also the option of sharing via Twitter.”
Source: http://bit.ly/SDhC5M
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/SDhC5N
Reviewer: Blogger on the Diabetes Forum, Diabetes.co.uk
Review: “Have you tried any apps for carbs counting? For food you prepare yourself at home, there is ‘Cook & Count Carbs’ app, which makes it easier to find exactly how much carbs is in each serving. There are also other carbs-counting apps with photographs of food on plates, though they are not as accurate. Good luck. It seems really tough, but carbs counting will become like almost second nature after a while.”
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“Have you tried any apps for carbs counting? For food you prepare yourself at home, there is ‘Cook & Count Carbs’ app, which makes it easier to find exactly how much carbs is in each serving. There are also other carbs-counting apps with photographs of food on plates, though they are not as accurate. Good luck. It seems really tough, but carbs counting will become like almost second nature after a while.”

Source: http://bit.ly/QhLgLD
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1753Z5q

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