Play to Cure: Genes in Space


Listed in: Cancer  
Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

Free

Space-themed game designed to help cancer researchers analyse data on breast cancer.

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with English

Cost

Free

Developer

Guerilla Tea Games
(Based in United Kingdom)
http://www.guerillatea.com ; Support email:

Funder

Cancer Research UK

Medical Adviser

Cancer Research UK ; Cambridge Institute, UK

Features

Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities
Information Information

Summary

Space-themed game designed to utilise the principles of crowdsourcing to help cancer researchers at Cancer Research UK's Cambridge Institute mass-analyse data on breast-cancer genes. The more people who play the game, the more valuable the data analysis reaching the cancer researchers. Can be played offline or online.


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Reviews

Reviewer: Cancer Research UK
Review: "The world’s first mobile phone that allows players to analyse real genetic data from cancer cells. Called 'Play To Cure: Genes in Space', we’ve developed the game to help our scientists get to grips with a major challenge facing researchers today – too much data, and not enough time to analyse it. We wanted to do something that we thought would help us to speed up our research. What we found is the analysis of data needs to be done by humans and the only way of really speeding that up is by getting more humans looking at that data. We believe that by doing a mobile phone game we can create something which enables people of all ages all around the world to look at that data. Every level that you play, every couple of minutes, you will be helping to accelerate our research and help us to beat cancer sooner. Professor Carlos Caldas from our Cambridge Research Institute, whose lab have provided the data for the gamers to analyse, explains in more detail: "We’re generating massive amounts of data: in this particular project we profiled tumours from 2,000 different breast cancer patients, and for each of those tumours we obtain over 2,000,000 data points. To analyse that data using human input it would take thousands of hours. So instead what we did is we analysed the data using computers. And you might think that computers are absolutely precise – they’re very good but they’re not 100% precise. The human eye is very good at recognising patterns, and at recognising changes in patterns. So what we hope is that by having people play the game, what they’re doing is using the data that we used to generate the new breast cancer classifications, that they will refine the precision of the calls and therefore refine the identification of new breast cancer genes. So they have the element of the game that is just playing a game. But to play the game - in order to enable the starship - they have to collect this 'substance alpha'. And when they go and collect substance alpha, without knowing what they’re doing, what they’re really doing is analysing the data. By calling where there are gains and losses - so the peaks and the troughs in the data - they are effectively helping us find and map the faulty genes. That information is collected through the computer from each of these players. Many players will look at the same data and we will be calling data from the same tumour, so we hope that by the crowd-sourcing that we will refine the precision of the calls. By navigating through the data, effectively displayed to them as this cosmic dust, what they’re doing is really routing and tracing precisely where there are flat copy numbers - where there are gains, and where there are losses – and they are also identifying where the breaks occur; where from one level you have a gain and then it has a loss and those co-ordinates are registered when they put a dot in their computer. Without realising, they’re giving us the co-ordinates where they think the breaks are occurring." "
Source: http://bit.ly/1kkvgpg
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/17AGFGO
Reviewer: Cancer Research and Relief Foundation (CRRF), USA
Review: " ‘Play to Cure: Genes in Space’ was created by Cancer Research UK. The charity collected two million pieces of data from 2,000 cancer patients. Players guide a spaceship across the screen collecting cargo. Each route that gamers take collects gene data to create genetic patterns. These patterns are sent to scientists who use them to detect faulty genes. This can help develop new drugs that target these faults, and stop cancer. Given the amount of hours that are wasted playing games on phones and tablets, it was only a matter of time before someone put all this game play to good use. Cancer Research UK has teamed up with agency Guerilla Tea to develop a game that will help scientists research faulty genes. The game is similar to ‘Space Invaders’, and, as players navigate through the on-screen asteroids, they are helping to create new genetic patterns. The more people that play the game, the more accurate the results, and once 10,000 people have downloaded and played the game, scientists will start to analyse the data. All the information will be fed back to a Cancer Research laboratory at Cambridge University."
Source: Source no longer available
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1kkvVXE
Reviewer: DES Daughter Network (UK)
Review: Recommended by DES Daughter Network
Source: http://bit.ly/1fB41U7
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1fB40zx

Your comments

all comments are moderated. View our comments policy →
comments powered by Disqus

Screenshots

Family
Family
Family




myhealthapps.net
is brought to you
by Patient View