mySugr Diabetes Logbook


Listed in: Carbo-counting / Diet  Blood glucose monitoring  Self-management  
mySugr Diabetes Logbook

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

Dutch / English / French / German / Italian / Polish / Spanish / Swedish

Cost:

Free, Pro version £20.99 [approximately €29.66, $32.74]

Diabetes logbook that awards points for meaningful entries with the aim of 'taming the diabetes monster' by overcoming challenges. For quick access for your mobile see Qcard in screenshots.

Approved by


Languages

Dutch / English / French / German / Italian / Polish / Spanish / Swedish

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with one of these languages

Cost

Free, Pro version £20.99 [approximately €29.66, $32.74]

Developer

mySugr GmbH
(Based in Austria)
http://mysugr.com/ ; Support email:

Funder

As technical developer

Medical Adviser

Lutz Heinemann, Co-founder of the Profile Institute for Metabolic Research GmbH in Neuss, Germany, Partnership with Santé Diabète (an NGO servicing in Western Africa - mainly supported by IDF and others) and JDRF (NGO focused on type 1 diabetes research).

Features

Reminders Reminders
Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities
Self-monitoring Self-monitoring
Trackers Trackers
Information Information

Summary

Diabetes logbook that awards points for meaningful entries, with the aim of 'taming the diabetes monster' by overcoming challenges. Easy logging with tags and notes. Multiple photographs (for instance, of food) can be added to each entry, and made more relevant by linking to a location (for instance, a restaurant). Data analysis includes graphs. Received FDA approval as a medical device in January 2013, and the developer has declared the app CE certified, indicating the app's compliance with EU legislation. 'mySugr Junior' is a free companion logbook app by the same developer, intended for children with diabetes.


Tags: Health, Wellness & Care in the Community (HWCC)

Reviews

Reviewer: Diabetes Voice, September 2013, International Diabetes Federation (IDF), Belgium
Review: “mySugr is an electronic diabetes diary that utilises a game platform to motivate users to track their diabetes data in a fun, unconventional format. mySugr doesn’t judge the quality of glucose variability, but instead rewards the user for participating. Earned points are tallied for gold stars indicated on a progress bar, letting users know how hard they’ve worked, and when they have beat their diabetes monster. For further motivation, mySugr offers challenges that can even result in donations to non-profit diabetes fund- raising and research organisations.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1aG6bzP
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1aG6bzV
Reviewer: Talley Henning Brown, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), USA
Review: “Anyone with type-1 diabetes (T1D) can tell you that managing the disease requires more than just testing and dosing. It requires regular analysis—and sometimes reanalysis—of patterns in blood-glucose levels. That can be a daunting responsibility. Companion makes it easier by giving a panoramic view of all the facts that may come into play in management. In addition to the numbers—blood-glucose levels, bolus amounts, carb counts—you can also make a record of the fine details, like the placement of an infusion set or sensor on any given day, changes in how you’re feeling, and photos of meals. Instead of being a chore, Companion makes management into a game. Every action you take, which you then log in the app, awards points. Reach 50 points in a day, and you tame the diabetes monster. (Literally—the app’s mascot is an animated green character that accompanies the user along the way to every T1D goal.) Another effect of mySugr’s management-as-game approach: it may help take the stress off. The team at mySugr designed Companion with the goal of not only motivating users toward their personal best in T1D management but also steering them away from the sense of discouragement that can come with an out-of-range number.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1aG6z1h
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1aG6z1j
Reviewer: Diabetes Mine—Diabetes blog, USA
Review: “A key to what makes this app unique is that it lets us of people with diabetes (PWDs) play with a ‘diabetes monster’ every time we enter data, so that the experience of monitoring our blood sugars, exercise, insulin and food — along with mood and behaviours — can be a little fun. In just a couple of weeks of using this app, I’m hooked. So what makes this app different? In my eyes, this app is different because it not only gives me the tools to log my health data, but makes that information actionable, and keeps me engaged. It’s not just logging. Rather, behaviour modification is what is behind MySugr. That’s where other apps have fallen short, for me. In my time using this app, I have found myself modifying my behaviour, and actually living healthier as a result of playing with MySugr on my iPad. The coolest thing is the gamification approach to keeping tabs on diabetes data. The app offers a ‘monster companion’ that each person names, and tries to ‘tame’ each day by logging data, staying in range, or just being active. The more points we get for these activities, the better we tame the D-Monster so that it’s not wrecking our potentially healthy lifestyles.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1aG6KK5
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/GWY1aA
Reviewer: MomentsofWonderful (MW) diabetes blog, USA
Review: “I am always willing to try an app that promises to make living with diabetes a little bit easier. The bar is set quite high however, for continued use of any of these apps. If there is no value added, it is not worth the time it takes to use it. Setting up mySugr was pretty easy. I did get a little confused with the slider bar (pictured below) though. I thought it wanted to know my insulin to carb ratio for some sort of meal calculation. Like a lot of people, I have a different ratio for different meals. I’ve only been using the app for a few days, so I am still trying out all the features. I logged my lunch yesterday, and earned points. It’s nice that I could earn points for things that I do anyway. There was an opportunity to earn more points by logging my location. I am not sure why the logbook would need my location. I don’t understand the benefit for me, and the safety and privacy issues are just too high for me to consider including that information. So what’s the point of points? To be totally honest, I am not sure yet. There are clear benefits to the app. It is easy to log BGs, food, insulin usage, and exercise all in one place. The inclusion of the monster makes a boring task a little more fun (especially when you can name it after a friend). The points are a great bonus, and rumour is that the connections to diabetes organisations are going to get stronger. If I can raise money for my favourite diabetes organisations by doing something that takes maybe five minutes out of my day, that is something that would definitely motivate me to use the app. As is the case with most diabetes apps, I am left wondering if I am the target market. I have an appointment with a new endocrinologist on Friday. I can almost guarantee you that he will have no interest in looking at any of the information from the app. I am left with the same issue that I end up with on most diabetes apps. What is the value added? Why should I use this app in addition to the other steps in my diabetes management? I’d suggest downloading it, and seeing if it fits with your current diabetes management plan, or can improve your management, and help you tame that diabetes monster.”
Source: http://bit.ly/1mc4r5L
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1mc4tuz
Reviewer: Diabetes patient organisation, Switzerland
Review: “The app provides daily challenges as an incentive to improve your diabetes management. Offers very useful reports and charts, and a search function lets you see your historical data. It is a medical device, and has CE marking and is registered with the FDA. It does lack a dictionary of terminology, though.”
Source: PatientView survey, December 2013
Usage: 11%-20%
Weblink of reviewer: -
Reviewer: Person living with diabetes, UK
Review: "[I recommend] mySugr, for tracking blood-glucose levels, carbs eaten, and insulin doses."
Source: PatientView survey, August 2014
Usage: Not specified

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