AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager


Listed in: Self-management  Diet  Lifestyle  
AgaMatrix Diabetes Manager

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

Free

Diabetes management log.

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with English

Cost

Free

Developer

AgaMatrix, USA
(Based in United States)
http://agamatrix.com

Funder

Same as technical developer

Medical Adviser

Same as technical developer

Features

Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities
Self-monitoring Self-monitoring
Trackers Trackers
Information Information

Summary

Diabetes management log. A user manually enters blood-glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, and insulin dosage. Trend charts and colour-coded results can be customised for hypo-/hyperglycaemic limits, mealtime schedules, and target ranges, and tags can contextualise readings. Data can be emailed to carers and healthcare professionals. Subjects covered on built-in videos by ‘dLife’ TV include healthy eating, lifestyle choices, and issues for other people living with diabetes. The app is also complementary to the ‘Wavesense Jazz’ glucose meter (although the ‘Jazz’ cannot yet synch with iPhone, a data cable is in development).


Tags: Medical

Reviews

Reviewer: Diabetes Mine, USA
Review: “The ‘WaveSense Jazz’ meter will be the first medical device to connect directly with the Apple iOS platform. A new download cable, demonstrated at the 2010 American Diabetes Association conference, will plug the ‘Jazz’ meter into the phone, so that users will eventually be able to automatically download their glucose data into the app. Visually, and in terms of functionality, it beats the competition hands down, if you ask me. It’s big, clear interface has been upgraded to provide more functionality: super-easy tabs for tagging your readings and making notes on them; graphical views in which important results are brightly highlighted; and the ability to tap any data point on a graph to immediately see details, notes, and tags on that individual result. You can also easily email charts of your results to your doctor or family members in basic CSV file format. Blood glucose results are color-coded, so that the highs and lows pop right out at you, so to speak. My one big gripe to date is the need for manual data entry.”
Source: http://bit.ly/bX7qLW
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://www.diabetesmine.com
Reviewer: Your Diabetes May Vary (YDMV) blog, USA
Review: This is a stand-alone logbook app. Entering data sucks, but this is clearly the first step. When they have Bluetooth working, this is going to be very cool. When you open the app, and accept the terms, it starts on a little ‘Home’ page. Since you are new, it points out two features to try right away—add information, or get help. You can push the other buttons as well, but these two are good places to start (well who starts with help?—this is America; we don’t do instructions). That leaves ‘Enter’. You can add carbs, a glucose reading, or insulin. Blood glucose and carbs go in similar screens. Insulin has a different look and feel. I assume that this is so that you know you are entering insulin. I am sure they thought it through, because everything else seems like they thought it through. When you enter blood glucose or carbs, there is a nice big screen and a key pad. It assumes that you are entering information for the current date and time, but that can be changed. The screen changes colour if you are above or below target ranges. They give you the option of entering a tag for the relationship to meals. Pre- or post-breakfast, lunch and dinner. Night is also an option. WaveSense has the good sense to not assume that it is pre- or post-meal by the time of day. It is like they get the idea that your schedule may vary (like your diabetes). There is a load of options to enter a host of notes. There are five note screens: ‘Food’, ‘Exercise’ (including my most common one, ‘Missed Exercise’), ‘Insulin’, ‘Meds’ and ‘Notes’. ‘Notes’ includes my favourite: ‘Dirty finger’. What a great and honest note for a test. You can add your own notes to the predefined options. This is brilliant, and the missing part of every log book I have seen. You want it as a note—you can make it. After you cram in data, you can look at it; log-book style, in charts or statistics. In the log and charts, all you need to do is touch an entry, and the details, notes, and all pop on to the screen. Why was that number out of range? Oh, yes, the set failed—I was attacked by a lime pie that made me miss my exercise, and I under-bolused (but, other than that, I was good).”
Source: http://bit.ly/38YN5v
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/1cKdlCl
Reviewer: DiabetesWellBeing, USA
Review: “True, this is the first glucose-meter company to have an app to help you track your glucose levels. I give major kudos to them for this innovation. However, as of this writing (March 2012), their ‘Jazz’ cannot yet sync with the phone, so data has to be entered manually. A data cable to sync automatically is pending.”
Source: http://bit.ly/UvCXNz
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://www.diabeteswellbeing.com

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