SmallTalk Pain Scale


Listed in: Pain  Aphasia  Apraxia  Dysarthria  
SmallTalk Pain Scale

Available on:



(click to download)

Supported languages:

English

Cost:

Free

Allows people who cannot speak (particularly people with aphasia, apraxia, or dysarthria) to communicate amount and type of pain felt to other people (including caregivers, family members, and healthcare professionals).

Approved by


Languages

English

Countries of use

Any in which the user is familiar with English

Cost

Free

Developer

Lingraphicare America Inc, USA
(Based in United States)
http://www.aphasia.com

Funder

Same as technical developer

Medical Adviser

Work with healthcare professionals

Features

Improving communication Improving communication
Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities Support to deal with symptoms/disabilities

Summary

Allows people who cannot speak (particularly people with aphasia, apraxia, or dysarthria) to communicate amount and type of pain felt to other people (including caregivers, family members, and healthcare professionals). Provides a vocabulary of pictures that talk in a natural human voice. The app’s pain scale is based on images and descriptions of pain from the ‘Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale’.


Tags: Disability

Reviews

Reviewer: Patient group specialising in communication disability, Australia
Review: “The advantages: the app offers the user a pain scale with words and faces for them to select their pain level. It has voice output, allowing the user to speak this aloud, as well as a selection of words to describe the pain. The disadvantages: the vocabulary in the app is not customisable at all, and is quite limiting.”
Source: PatientView survey, July-August 2012
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: -
Reviewer: Central Coast Children, USA
Review: “This app contains a series of images and pain descriptions that let the user communicate the type and level of pain. Some reviews mentioned that this app does not allow for sentence construction, or any editing. However, it does allow for a great deal of specificity by offering vocabulary for body parts, positional words, and pain-related adjectives (such as aching, dull, radiating, sharp, etc).”
Source: http://bit.ly/MX4p1l
Usage: Not specified
Weblink of reviewer: http://bit.ly/GZprfk

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